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South American accountants well paid

Accountants in Brazil are the second highest paid in the world in relative disposable income terms, according to research conducted by accountancy recruiter Marks Sattin.

Brazil comes in at a close second behind Peru with an average monthly income of $3,671. UK accountants were placed fifth with monthly income of $3,333.

The results are measured by purchasing power parity.

Marks Sattin also reported a 60 percent increase in accountancy jobs in Brazil over the past two years, apparently due to sustained economic growth and the adoption of IFRS.

“Brazil has the world’s eighth largest economy by nominal GDP and was one of the first emerging markets to recover from the global recession,” Brazil country manager of Marks Sattin Daniel Santiago Faria said,

“In July 2010, there were 439,051 registered accountants in Brazil, up from 410,596 in July 2009, a 7 percent increase. At the current rate, there will be half a million accountants in the country by mid-2010.”

 

 

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