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European countries are the most ready to manage distributive change, KPMG index finds

European countries dominate the top 10 of countries most ready to manage disruptive change, according to KPMG International 2017 change readiness index.

The index ranks 136 countries on their readiness to manage disruptive changes and is structured around three areas: enterprise capability, government capability and people and civil society capability.

“In 2017, every top-ten country, with the exception of Singapore, increased its government and people & civil society capability scores over 2015,” KPMG International said in a statement. “Just four of the top 20 ranked countries saw a decline in people & civil society scores, whereas 25 of the bottom 30 countries in the rankings declined in this capability.”

European countries took seven of the top 10 places in this year’s ranking with Switzerland taking the top seed by overtaking Singapore who fell to the 4th position behind Sweden and the United Arab Emirates.

For the first time, the UK made it to the Top 10 which might be welcomed news in times of Brexit uncertainties.

While high-income countries are generally better placed in the ranking Rwanda ranked 46th in 2017, making it the only low-income country in the top 50. KPMG International said Rwanda owned their ranking to their good score in government capability where they ranked 21st.

“Rwanda’s progress can offer lessons for other countries as to how strengthening fundamental institutions and achieving political stability can lay the foundation for much greater change readiness,” KPMG International global head of the international development assistance services institute Trevor Davies.

The full ranking is accessible on KPMG website

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